Yahoo! News Photo Staff

Striking NASA satellite views of the California wildfires

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https://www.yahoo.com/news/striking-nasa-satellite-views-california-slideshow-wp-175952302.html

A week of destructive fires in Southern California is ending but danger still looms.

Even as firefighters made progress containing six major wildfires from Santa Barbara to San Diego County and most evacuees were allowed to return home, predicted gusts of up to 50 mph (80 kph) through Sunday posed a threat of flaring up existing blazes or spreading new ones. High fire risk is expected to last into January.

Overall, the fires have destroyed nearly 800 homes and other buildings, killed dozens of horses and forced more than 200,000 people to flee flames that have burned over 270 square miles since Monday, Dec. 4. (AP)

Here’s a look at NASA photos taken from the

International Space Station

and from NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center’s ER-2 aircraft.



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From a Dec. 8, 2017, International Space Station flyover of Southern California, NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik photographed the plumes of smoke rising from wildfires. (Photo: NASA)


The wildfires in Southern California were photographed by NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik from the International Space Station during a flyover of the region on Dec. 7, 2017. (Photo: NASA)


The wildfires in Southern California were photographed by NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik from the International Space Station during a flyover of the region on Dec. 7, 2017. (Photo: NASA)


Expedition 53 Commander Randy Bresnik aboard the International Space Station took this photo of the California wildfires in the Los Angeles on Dec. 6, 2017. (Photo: NASA)


Expedition 53 Commander Randy Bresnik aboard the International Space Station took this photo of the California wildfires in the Los Angeles on Dec. 6, 2017. (Photo: NASA)


Thick smoke streams from several fires in southern California on Dec. 5, 2017. The largest of the blazes – the fast-moving Thomas fire in Ventura County – had charred more than 65,000 acres, according to Cal Fire. Smaller smoke plumes from the Creek and Rye fires are also visible. (Photo: NASA/AFP)


A photo taken from the International Space Station and moved on social media by astronaut Randy Bresnik shows smoke rising from wildfire burning in Southern California, Dec. 6, 2017. (Photo: @AstroKomrade/NASA/Handout via Reuters)


A photo taken from the International Space Station and moved on social media by astronaut Randy Bresnik shows smoke rising from wildfire burning in Southern California, Dec. 5, 2017. (Photo: @AstroKomrade/NASA/Handout via Reuters)


A photo taken from the International Space Station and moved on social media by astronaut Randy Bresnik shows smoke rising from wildfire burning in Southern California, Dec. 5, 2017. (Photo: @AstroKomrade/NASA/Handout via Reuters)


A view from NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center’s ER-2 aircraft shows smoke plumes, from roughly 65,000 feet, produced by the Thomas Fire in Ventura County, California, around 1 p.m. PST on Dec. 5, 2017. (Photo: NASA/Stu Broce)


A photo taken from the International Space Station and moved on social media by astronaut Randy Bresnik shows smoke rising from wildfire burning in Southern California, Dec. 6, 2017. (Photo: @AstroKomrade/NASA/Handout via Reuters)


A photo taken from the International Space Station and moved on social media by astronaut Randy Bresnik shows smoke rising from wildfire burning in Southern California, (Photo: @AstroKomrade/NASA/Handout via Reuters)


A photo taken from the International Space Station and moved on social media by astronaut Randy Bresnik shows smoke rising from wildfire burning in Southern California, Dec. 6, 2017. (Photo: @AstroKomrade via Twitter)


The Multi Spectral Imager (MSI) on the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-2 satellite captured the data for a false-color image of the burn scar – active fires appear orange, the burn scar is brown, unburned vegetation is green, and developed areas are gray. The Sentinel-2 image is based on observations of visible, shortwave infrared, and near infrared light, acquired Dec. 5, 2017. (Photo: NASA)