Yahoo! News Photo Staff

Eagle-eyed! Photographer captures stunning pictures of world's last remaining Mongolian eagle keepers

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https://www.yahoo.com/news/eagle-eyed-photographer-captures-stunning-slideshow-wp-110026806.html

These stunning photographs of the world’s last remaining Mongolian eagle keepers show the incredible bond between man and bird. The images, taken last month by photography tour guide Daniel Kordan, 29, show a group of 10 eagle hunters traveling between West and South Mongolia and across the Gobi Desert. The hunters train eagles from an early age and look after the majestic birds until they reach the age of 12.

Kordan said: “When we were in Western Mongolia, we were greeted as nomads and Kazakh eagle hunters. “I hope the pictures will help to preserve the unique nomad culture. There are only 250 to 300 eagle hunters left now, who will pass their traditions down through generations.” (Caters News)

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These stunning photographs of the world’s last remaining Mongolian eagle keepers show the incredible bond between man and bird. (Photo: Daniel Kordan/Caters News)


The images were taken by photography tour guide Daniel Kordan, 29, in September 2018. (Photo: Daniel Kordan/Caters News)


Daniel, from Moscow, learned that the hunters train eagles from an early age and look after the majestic birds until they are 12 years of age. (Photo: Daniel Kordan/Caters News)


He said: “When we were in Western Mongolia, we were greeted as nomads andKazakh eagle hunters.” (Photo: Daniel Kordan/Caters News)


“I hope the pictures will help to preserve the unique nomad culture,” Kordan says. (Photo: Daniel Kordan/Caters News)


The photos show a group of 10 eagle hunters travelling between West and South Mongolia and across the Gobi Desert. (Photo: Daniel Kordan/Caters News)


“There are only 250 to 300 eagle hunters left now, who will pass their traditions down through generations.” (Photo: Daniel Kordan/Caters News)


The eagles are used to hunt foxes and small hares in order to get fur as well as food. (Photo: Daniel Kordan/Caters News)


Daniel witnessed the eagle hunters showing their skills via traditional games such as calling from the cliff. (Photo: Daniel Kordan/Caters News)


The tour guide said the experience was like stepping back in time 600 years. (Photo: Daniel Kordan/Caters News)


“I found it extremely fascinating that people still live a traditional life in modern society,” Kordan says. (Photo: Daniel Kordan/Caters News)


Kordan added: “Once the eagle reaches the age of 12, the hunters release the bird so it can live the second part of its life in freedom.” (Photo: Daniel Kordan/Caters News)


“Golden Eagles usually weigh around 8 to 10 kilograms.” (Photo: Daniel Kordan/Caters News)


The female birds are especially prized, as they are bigger and better hunters. (Photo: Daniel Kordan/Caters News)


Photo: Daniel Kordan/Caters News


“Nomads live a traditional life in harsh conditions, so the eagles help them to get food as well as making warm clothes.” (Photo: Daniel Kordan/Caters News)


Photo: Daniel Kordan/Caters News


Photo: Daniel Kordan/Caters News