Yahoo! News Photo Staff

U.S. troops help fortify southern border as migrant caravan approaches

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https://www.yahoo.com/news/u-troops-help-fortify-u-slideshow-wp-165619694.html

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis defended the use of active duty troops on the U.S.-Mexican border, saying that in some ways it provides good training for war. He argued that it’s analogous to a 1916 deployment to counter the Mexican revolutionary Gen. Francisco “Pancho” Villa.

The Pentagon chief said that within a week to 10 days the 5,800 troops currently deployed for the border mission will have accomplished all the tasks initially requested by Customs and Border Protection, although additional tasks are now being worked out between the Pentagon and the Department of Homeland Security. Mattis did not say how soon the mission might end; current deployments are scheduled to last until Dec. 15, but that could change.

In addition to the 5,800 active duty troops in the border area, about 2,100 National Guard troops have been providing border support since April.

Mattis said the short-term objective is to get sufficient numbers of wire and other barriers in place along the border as requested by Customs and Border Protection. The longer-term objective, he said, is “somewhat to be determined.” (AP)

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U.S. Marines help to build a concertina wire barricade at the U.S. Mexico border in preparation for the arrival of a caravan of migrants at the San Ysidro border crossing in San Diego, Calif., Nov. 13, 2018. (Photo: Mike Blake/Reuters)


U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis is briefed on the U.S. military’s border deployment at Base Camp Donna in Donna, Texas, Nov. 14, 2018. (Photo: Phil Stewart/Reuters)


U.S. Army soldiers with the 889th Engineering Support Company, lay concertina wire along the Gateway International Bridge in Brownsville, Texas, Nov. 10, 2018. (Photo: U.S. Air Force/SrA Alexandra Minor/Handout via REeuters)


A U.S. Marine stands guard, as fellow Marines set up a barricade with concertina wire, at the border between Mexico and the U.S., in preparation for the arrival of migrants, in Tijuana, Mexico, Nov. 13, 2018. (Photo: Jorge Duenes/Reuters)


Members of a U.S Army engineering brigade place Concertina wire around an encampment for troops, Department of Defense and U.S. Customs and Border Protection near the U.S.-Mexico International bridge, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, in Donna, Texas. (Photo: Eric Gay/AP)


The El Paso Sector of U.S. Border Patrol take part in a crowd control exercise at the railroad crossing on the U.S. border, as seen from the Mexican side of the border in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Nov.9, 2018. (Photo: Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters)


The El Paso Sector of U.S. Border Patrol take part in a crowd control exercise at the railroad crossing on the U.S. border, as seen from the Mexican side of the border in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Nov. 9, 2018. (Photo: Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters)


U.S. Border Patrol agents with the horse patrol unit prepare for exercises in Mission, Texas, Nov. 8, 2018. (Photo: Adrees Latif/Reuters)


U.S. Army Cpl. Jeremy Crossley, a senior Intel Analyst with Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force 7 explains the capabilities of the Puma, an unmanned Aerial Vehicle, to young men and women from the Customs and Border Protection Explorer Program, in San Diego, Calif., Nov. 10, 2018. (Photo: Pfc. Nyatan Bol/Handout via Reuters)


The El Paso Sector of U.S. Border Patrol take part in a crowd control exercise at the railroad crossing on the U.S. border, as seen from the Mexican side of the border in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Nov. 9, 2018. (Photo: Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters)


Army engineers install concertina wire on the Anzalduas International Bridge, as Northern Command provides military support to the Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Customs and Border Protection to secure the southern border of the United States in Anzalduas, Texas, Nov. 5, 2018. (Photo: Airman First Class Daniel A. Hernandez/U.S. Air Force/Handout via Reuters)


An agent with the U.S. Border Patrol Tactical Unit (BORTAC) holds his weapon from an armored vehicle ahead of exercises in Mission, Texas, Nov. 8, 2018. (Photo: Adrees Latif/Reuters)


The El Paso Sector of U.S. Border Patrol take part in a crowd control exercise at the railroad crossing on the U.S. border, as seen from the Mexican side of the border in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Nov. 9, 2018. (Photo: Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters)


U.S. Army soldiers prepare to install concertina wire along the United States – Mexico border in Hidalgo, Texas, Nov. 8, 2018. (Photo: Adrees Latif/Reuters)


U.S. Army soldiers install barbed wire fence along Anzalduas International Bridge near the U.S.-Mexico border in McAllen, Texas, Nov. 5, 2018. (Photo: Delcia Lopez/Reuters)


Members of the U.S. Army build a razor wire fence around area for tents near the U.S.-Mexico International bridge, Saturday, Nov. 3, 2018, in Donna, Texas. (Photo: Eric Gay/AP)


Razor wire recently placed by the U.S.military along the banks of the Rio Grande frames the McAllen-Hidalgo International Bridge at the U.S.-Mexico border, Saturday, Nov. 3, 2018, in McAllen, Texas. (Photo: Eric Gay/AP)


U.S. Army soldiers take rest at the Camp Donna military base along the United States – Mexico border in Donna, Texas, Nov. 8, 2018. (Photo: Adrees Latif/Reuters)


A member of the U.S. Army keeps watch from behind a razor wire barricade near the U.S.-Mexico International bridge, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, in Donna, Texas. (Photo: Eric Gay/AP)


Pedestrians pass members of the U.S.military working to place razor wire along the U.S.-Mexico border on the McAllen-Hidalgo International Bridge, Friday, Nov. 2, 2018, in McAllen, Texas. (Photo: Eric Gay/AP)


Members of the U.S.military place razor wire along the U.S.-Mexico border on the McAllen-Hidalgo International Bridge, Friday, Nov. 2, 2018, in McAllen, Texas. (Photo: Eric Gay/AP)